10 Apps Teens are Using that Parents Need to Know

April Requard appsolutelyapril.com

March 20, 2018

Not all social apps are bad. Most of the apps our kids use are truly an extension of your child’s “real world” social life. For the most part, our kids talk to people they only talk to in “real life.” With the influence of technology in our kids social lives, we can’t panic or over think every single thing, but we do need to empower each other and be aware of what our kids are doing when they are online and engaged in these apps. We teach our children how to swim so they don’t drown and the same is true for online social behaviors. We have to talk to our kids and teach them how to navigate through this rapidly-changing online world. I believe strongly in not blocking everything, but in my opinion, there are certain apps that are just off-limits. I will share some those with you in this post. The problem in most cases is that parents just don’t know how bad some of these apps can really be. The truth is told so perfectly by Kevin Honeycutt when he says, “Our kids are growing up on a digital playground and no one is on recess duty.” So true.

It’s not all bad…

For every heart wrenching story about cyberbullying, there are many stories of teenagers and adults using social media for good. When people come together on social media to start a movement or create awareness for something they believe in, change really does come and that’s amazing. As an educator, I have witnessed teachers using social media to change their teaching practices, gain new perspectives, and completely transform who they are as teachers as a result of being connected to other educators.

It’s all about parent empowerment!

It’s our job as parents to help our children navigate through this world that changes so fast as a result of our ever-changing technology ecosystem.

Here’s a blog post I wrote a year ago about a fabulous app that I use every single day as a time-limit allowance for my kids using their phones. You can read about it here. I HIGHLY recommend this application.

Enabling Parental Restrictions for iOS:

Step-by-step guide to enabling parental controls and restrictions on an iOS device:

ios restrictions.001

Click here for an article for Android devices.

Location Services:

If location services are on, chances are your child’s location is being shared while using one of the apps. This is an important feature to turn off in specific applications.

Turn Off Location Services.png

Multiple User (Fake) Accounts:

IMG_7639

Many social media platforms allow for more than one user account. Kids will use one profile to interact with their friends and the other one is their “angel” account where they’d only post what they’d want their grandmother to see. In Instagram, kids call it a “finsta” which means “fake Instagram” account. In order to find out if your kiddo has multiple accounts, you need access to their phone and you need their passcode. If you don’t know their passcode, it might be time to have a whole other conversation. 😬 Once you are in the phone, open Instagram. Tap the head icon and that will open the profile. Tap on their name at the top of the screen. If there are multiple accounts, you will see them, if not, you won’t see any other accounts. It’s really easy to create a secondary account, so just watch for this and do periodic phone checks!

Secret Apps:

These apps are a photo vault that hides many types of photos when you open the app, it functions like a regular calculator, but when you type in your passcode, your secret photos come up.

There are child predators who know about these apps and try to engage with your child. Additionally, your child could be keeping secret photos (sexting or otherwise) that they don’t want you to see.

blog files.001blog files.002

Hope you all find this helpful! #themoreyouknow #ittakesavillage

 

Advertisements

Name Equations in Keynote

blog post.001

This project collides literacy and math in a way that allows students to express themselves creatively. When you have combinations like that, a lesson is sure to be a success.

This project takes students down a powerful path in understanding a program such as Keynote (traditionally only thought of for presentations). Here are some of the skills they will learn in this fun project:

  • Inserting text to create name (change font, size, color, and alignment)
  • Learn to organize and space items appropriate for proportion of slide size
  • Align text and shapes (spacing and sizing are important for this!)
  • Search through the shapes library to find shapes that begin with the letters of their first name (phonics in action)
  • Add up how many shapes are in each letter column
  • Create an equation based on the number of shapes in each column
  • Change the background color of a slide
  • Export each slide as an image (Mac) or take a screen shot of slide in full screen (iPad)
  • Share!

Ways to share student creations:

  • Have each student upload their image to a Padlet wall.
  • Each student uses Airdrop to drop their image to one iPad and that one iPad can combine all to create an iMovie or Clips video with all of the class images.
  • Each student can create a checkthis.com site where they upload their image and write about what each one of the shapes represents. When students are finished, they can publish their site and share their URL with their friends and families!

Each child’s creation will be different and students will interpret the shapes in different ways. It’s important to note that some shapes have multiple meanings and can start with various lettters. For example, in the creative piece below, Austin uses a fork for the word utencil under the letter U.

austin.001