Create a Magazine Cover in Keynote

Keynote to CreateMagazine Covers

As most of you know, Keynote is my go-to tool for creating just about anything. One of the things I love to have my students create is magazine covers. They can use these covers to highlight a topic or subject they recently studied, they could feature an image of a person whom they studied, or they could create a cover of themselves showcasing something they’ve recently participated in.  Regardless of the topic they choose, creating a magazine cover will introduce students into so many tools in Keynote and teach them some skills in  graphic design. There are many online magazine generators that will allow for the creation of magazine covers, but they have all of the magazines, some of which are totally inappropriate for school. Additionally, you can easily create a template for your students so that the formatting is already complete and all they have to do is plug in their information.

Here’s the steps in creating your own cover in Keynote!

Keynote opens in landscape mode, so the first step is changing the orientation of the slide. Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 9.29.01 AM

 

 

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Reverse the numbers so that your slide is 768 x 1024

Screen Shot 2016-02-24 at 9.29.46 AMThis is how your new slide should look

Now, you are ready to begin adding elements to your cover. Here’s a cheat sheet that I created, which includes elements and tips for formatting text and adding shapes. Click Magazine Cover Elements to download the PDF.

Magazine Cover Elements.001

This project will take users down a path in really getting to know the format tool in Keynote as they will work to change the color of shapes, use the arrange tool to send objects to the front or the back, format text, and also draw their own unique shapes to be used as placeholders for photos. This all adds interesting elements to the design. Once users add a shape as a placeholder, they simply drag in their desired photo and drop it on the shape. Then, the user can adjust the size of the photo so that it fits perfectly in the shape by using the masking tool.

Here is a TIME magazine cover created by one of my students.

time magazine cover Landon.001

The details added in this example:

This student used a large square with no fill and added a very thick border (red) and did the same thing for the smaller black border. He searched for a TIME magazine .png image to use as the title because we were not having any luck locating the Time Magazine font. He also added a shape for the main title to stand out. Additionally, he included a barcode that he created. You can create your own unique barcode at this bar code generator.

If you don’t have Keynote, you can create some very cool magazine covers here.

It is very fun to see what students create and how this allows them to report on something they’ve learned in a relevant and fun way!

 

 

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Guess Who? A Getting to Know You Project Using Tech Tools

Guess Who?

Here’s a super fun project that allows students to creatively use technology as a tool to get to know their classmates. In this project, I will show you two of my favorite things…photo editing and CheckThis. I’ve blogged about CheckThis in the past (click here). It’s a  free web application where students can create online posters with so many cool tools…a great way to share learning, create quizzes for classmates, and create quick posters on learning concepts. Best of all, it’s easy and students do not need an account to create! Here’s how it’s done:

Using PhotoBooth on a MacBook, iMac, or iPad, have students take a picture of themselves with the built-in camera.

Click here and click on EDIT. You don’t need an account for this project (this is why I love this site).

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Click on effects and choose the Focal Pixelate option. This will allow the user to pixelate their photo in order to disguise who the person is.

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Another option is using the Skitch app on the iPad to pixelate the photo. Once your photo is Pixelated, then save it to the Camera Roll (iOS) or take a screen shot (OS X) (Command, Shift, 4).

Open up the CheckThis web app. Click on Create New Post and then click Create a Post Online.

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Now, students can title their post. They can delete unwanted elements by clicking on the trash icon. Additionally, students can re-order elements by clicking the gear. To add additional elements, students can click the + sign. For this particular project, I had the students add a title, pixelated photo, 5 descriptive sentences detailing something about themselves (nothing personal), and then poll the audience to see if they can figure out who the person is.

Screen Shot 2015-08-31 at 6.05.40 PM

Once finished, students can personality to their post by changing the colors and fonts.

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Additionally, you can add a custom background and fine-tune who can see the link. I always have the students hide the link so that it’s only visible if you have the links. Then, click publish…no edit.

Screen Shot 2015-08-31 at 6.06.21 PM

You will now have your own URL to share. I usually collect all the URLs via Google Docs and share them with the students the next class period so that they can visit each other’s sites and vote on who is who in their class. Finally, I have students create a QR code as a nice way to showcase this project when they return home from school and show their families.

Here’s an example of my finished poster! Click here to see the live link with the polling feature active. Have fun creating these with your class! The possibilities are truly endless!

Guess Who Project by April Requard

Guess Who Project by April Requard

Happy creating!

April

iTunes U Course: Array City in Keynote

I am excited to share my new iTunes U course called Array City in Keynote!

Keynote is my favorite tool for both iPad and Mac. I just love figuring out new ways to use it and I get inspired by seeing something on paper and thinking about how I can bring it to life with Keynote. So, I decided to create a course with one of those ideas and I hope you will think it’s as fun as I do. I saw a lesson on Pinterest that had students making arrays with buildings, but they were using construction paper and glue. I thought it would be cool to take that idea and use the shape tool in Keynote, thus, Array City for Keynote was born!

Using Keynote (iOS), students have the ability to connect the real world to math by constructing large city buildings with the shape tool in Keynote. This is a fun and engaging way to demonstrate knowledge of multiplication & arrays and allows students to be creative while using technology. So much more than just math standards are addressed with this lesson! I hope you’ll subscribe to my course and check it out! The course is for teachers to replicate this idea or lesson with their students. All you need is an iPad with iTunes U, then click on this link to download the course! Thanks in advance for giving it some love! 🙂

https://itunes.apple.com/us/course/array-city-in-keynote/id1024001059

iTunes U Course: Array City

iTunes U Course: Array City